Sketchbook

The Proposal,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Minimizer, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Jackass,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Bed of Roses,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

CakeWalk,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Object of Desire,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Stranded,by Lee Puffer. paper 9"x12"

Perpetual Oyster,by Lee Puffer. paper 9"x12"

Target, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Carrion Bag, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Busy Body, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Queen of Nothing, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Idle Gossip, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Cowgirl,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

Cougar,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"

By default we think of drawing, both noun and verb, as dragging pencil across paper or the evidence of that action. That is not untrue. If we also consider drawing as anything that works in parallel to, or in preparation for, an artist’s primary practice, then these collages are also drawings. Using cut paper, and quickly assembled, these sketches allow me to record ideas for possible future sculptures. There are always so many more ideas than there is time to make them in sculpture. Some ideas are not worth pursuing further. Drawings are artworks and sometimes they are the only record of an artistic idea or impulse. What I find most interesting about drawing as a record is that it gives insight into an artist’s thought process, sometimes more than the resulting sculpture. These collages are part of an ongoing sketchbook. Some of these thoughts make their way into The Hankie Project, some into the Welcome to Oblivion or Stimulatorium series.

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Sketchbook

The Proposal,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
The Proposal,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Minimizer, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Minimizer, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Jackass,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Jackass,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Bed of Roses,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Bed of Roses,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
CakeWalk,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
CakeWalk,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Object of Desire,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Object of Desire,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Stranded,by Lee Puffer. paper 9"x12"
Stranded,by Lee Puffer. paper 9″x12″
Perpetual Oyster,by Lee Puffer. paper 9"x12"
Perpetual Oyster,by Lee Puffer. paper 9″x12″
Target, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Target, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Carrion Bag, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Carrion Bag, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Busy Body, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Busy Body, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Queen of Nothing, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Queen of Nothing, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Idle Gossip, by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Idle Gossip, by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Cowgirl,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Cowgirl,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″
Cougar,by Lee Puffer. paper 12"x12"
Cougar,by Lee Puffer. paper 12″x12″

 

By default we think of drawing, both noun and verb, as dragging pencil across paper or the evidence of that action. That is not untrue. If we also consider drawing as anything that works in parallel to, or in preparation for, an artist’s primary practice, then these collages are also drawings. Using cut paper, and quickly assembled, these sketches allow me to record ideas for possible future sculptures. There are always so many more ideas than there is time to make them in sculpture. Some ideas are not worth pursuing further. Drawings are artworks and sometimes they are the only record of an artistic idea or impulse. What I find most interesting about drawing as a record is that it gives insight into an artist’s thought process, sometimes more than the resulting sculpture. These collages are part of an ongoing sketchbook. Some of these thoughts make their way into The Hankie Project, some into the Welcome to Oblivion or Stimulatorium series’. A few of these may be on exhibit at Intervention. You’ll have to go to A Ship in the Woods to find out.

Hung Out to Dry

Stacked
“Stacked” from Hung Out to Dry:The Hankie Project

As a figurative sculptor working on a human scale, Hung Out to Dry: The Hankie Project began as a series of small collages which were like sketches, a way for me to capture, evaluate and catalog my ideas for possible future large-scale sculpture. The small collage images, or studies, once transferred to hankies, became a way to express the volume and complexity of the messages and experiences women and girls internalize every single day. The hankie is an effective information delivery system for these ideas. Hankies are small and portable, personal and intimately involved with the female body (sweat, tears, snot…). Coupled with the ghostlike and fragmented presence of the fine porcelain hands,  Hung Out to Dry: The Hankie Project,  presents a distinct and contemporary point of view on women’s issues.

Hung Out to Dry: The Hankie Project represents my ongoing interest in feminist issues and cultural critique. The images and corresponding text on the vintage hankies allows me to present my strong oppositional views on tropes, clichés and widely held beliefs about girlhood, women’s roles, and femininity. I attempt to present this point of view with biting humor, sensitivity, and compassion.

See the project in progress here.