Shades of Grey

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat's Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

from the Cat’s Cradle series, by Lee Puffer. Unglazed high fired porcelain, wood, rope.

There was a time when a colonial hunter would keep fragments of the animals he killed mounted on wooden plaques and displayed in his trophy room. These mounted porcelain double-hand sculptures allude to that practice. There are six sets of severed female hands, bound by rope. Coupled with the series of photographs (one seen here) this body of work is about desire; the base, human desire to own, dominate, and control.

This series, entitled Cat’s Cradle, is rife with contrast. The hands are bound, yet they interact with the rope, complicit in their bondage. The thick, rough black rope juxtaposes the delicate, ghostly white porcelain of the hands. There are elements of femininity and masculinity, beauty and ugliness, attraction and repulsion.

It is not unusual for me to reference popular culture in my work, and the title of this blog post is a nod to that. As we are steeped in popular culture through our constant access to media, there is no denying its impact. I see pop culture references as an entry point into the artwork, adding to its accessibility. Using relevant and sometimes controversial imagery might compel someone to look at the artwork. It is my hope that the quality and resonance of the work compels them to linger and contemplate deeper meanings.

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